First-time posters: please review the site's moderation policy

In these times of uncertainty, I have a question about professional and actual addresses.

We all know that some interpreters live physically in one city, and have their professional address in another city, where they work as a local. What obligations exist when we are hired to go to a third city if we are unable to make the assignment due to a disturbance in our physical city of residence rather than in our professional domicile?

To give a concrete example, let's say the interpreter were living in London but professionally based as a local in Paris. The interpreter has a contract in Prague, and is flying from London. In normal circumstances, this goes smoothly, and is sometimes cheaper than flying from Paris, so organizers are happy to save the money.

In unusual circumstances, something happens on the travel day, and all flights are cancelled out of London, but not out of Paris. Trains and buses may work, but be overcrowded as flights are cancelled. What are the interpreter's obligations in this case?

Just as an aside, this has already happened to me with general strikes, etc., and I have left a day early and paid for the extra time in the destination city from my own pocket, or I changed my method of travel. But I don't know where to find anything that tells me what exactly my obligations are to the organizer and the team.

Thanks in advance for any clarification!

asked 29 Mar '16, 13:18

JuliaP's gravatar image

JuliaP
2.9k249


J'ai en effet eu le courage de vous suivre en silence et j'en tire pour ma part une conclusion qui me parait plus suffisante que satisfaisante: les obligations de droit ne pourront être déterminées qu'au cas par cas tandis que l'éthique déontologique veut que nous mettions tout en œuvre pour éviter des scenarios qui pourraient nuire à l'organisateur, au recruteur, à nos collègues, et finalement à notre réputation.

permanent link

answered 04 Apr '16, 05:37

Licia's gravatar image

Licia
412

Thanks Licia for putting it so elegantly! That is the conclusion I had come to as well, but wanted to make sure.

(04 Apr '16, 08:29) JuliaP

hmmm...good question, Julia :-), with both practical, legal and ethical implications.

In practice and should I indeed be unable to make it, I would of course alert the recruiter and/or organiser and propose a suitable/feasible colleague (whose availability and willingness I would have determined beforehand) - just like in any other situation entailing the same consequence, irrespective of my professional or actual location, for whatever reason.

Some contracts include a force majeure clause - and even those that don't might be construed to fall under one, depending on the law of the land in question - but that would apply only to whatever affects venues covered by that contract, though, which would exclude your scenario.

Ethically, I would do as you did, ie bite the bullet and bear whatever extra costs I would have to incur to honour my commitment, as long as physically feasible.

permanent link

answered 29 Mar '16, 19:57

msr's gravatar image

msr
4.7k6923

edited 29 Mar '16, 19:57

Thank you msr ;-) ! I am a bit more interested in what we should do when we can't bite the bullet, and you have given me an answer - one that I had suspected but wasn't sure enough about. This is very helpful!

(29 Mar '16, 20:15) JuliaP

As a follow-up, now that I have thought a bit more, does this mean that my obligations are no different than if I lived in the city of my professional address and something went wrong there on the travel day? There would be no difference in what I have to do, even though I am not arriving from "home"?

This could also be extrapolated to people who are working outside their home base and travel from one job to another, or who are coming straight from vacation to work, etc., so a much wider group of people than just those of us who don't live where we work.

(31 Mar '16, 14:01) JuliaP
1

Hoping wiser colleagues will join us,the way I see it, Julia - and if I may be pardoned for stating the obvious - one choses one's professional domicile for professional reasons, and one's private domicile for private reasons. I would not go as far as saying "and ne'er the twain shall... mix" :-) but to my mind professional obligations refer to our professional domicile alone: those of us whose domiciles do not coincide must factor that into our strategies... and probably take out private travel insurance to cover possible disturbances affecting journeys from personal to professional domiciles. Having one's contracts acknowledge this "triangular" situation could also, I suppose, be envisaged, probably with comercial implications, though. So as to be sure I understand them, how would you answer your own two questions? As to your two examples, the 1st one strikes me as the opposite of our situation, ie someone w/o a professional "domicile"... and as to the 2nd, I don't think most employers' hearts would bleed over "from vacation to work" woes :-).

(31 Mar '16, 14:45) msr

True dat on the vacation. That has already happened to me, and I moved heaven and earth to get where I needed to be, after having found someone who could cover if necessary.

As to the job, that isn't so much something I can do anything about, as I am not in my domicile for work reasons - but I would have let both employers know about that fact, so if there were an unforeseen happening, I would have done what I needed to do - I think. I have heard about interpreters who just don't show up for the second job and send an email explaining the first one got extended, but without any notice.

(31 Mar '16, 19:32) JuliaP

Let me give you a recruiter's take on this:

Your professional address is, with your language combination and your overall qualifications, why get recruited or not.

If I'm offering you a job in, say, Brussels and you tell me that you're based in Brussels, I also expect you live in or around Brussels, or at least have a place to stay in the city.

That's not just because recruiting a local interpreter guarantees that there will never be any travel costs involved, only the interpreter's fees.

That's also because as a recruiter, I need to be sure that all interpreters will be on location at least 30 minutes before the meeting starts, and I don't want to take undue risks.

If you're a pretend local interpreter, and you are making your own travel arrangements, at your own expense of course, to get to every assignment in the city of your supposed professional address, there will always be a higher risk that, someday, something will go wrong.

When that's the case, don't even try to invoke force majeure.

In my book, this is a case of fraud by false representation and you are liable for damages, as a no-show on your part may have put the team in a bit of a tight spot and I may even lose the client over the incident.

Now, genuine local interpreters also travel out-of-town for assignments, and they may be prevented from traveling back to their professional address in time for their next local assignment (for instance because Brussels was under lockdown last week and the airport is still closed). That would be a case of force majeure.

That said, if I'm recruiting you as a local interpreter for a gig in Brussels and you know you'll be traveling back to Brussels the day before under a tight schedule and there's a chance you might miss your flight home, I would appreciate knowing about it before finalising the contract.

permanent link

answered 01 Apr '16, 05:36

Vincent%20Buck's gravatar image

Vincent Buck
3.9k203350

edited 01 Apr '16, 08:56

Hi Vincent, thanks for answering, and you lead me to ask the following question - do you think that we then shouldn't have professional addresses that are different from our physical addresses at all? Because as a recruiter who is a member of AIIC, just like the UN, the EU, and all the coordinated organizations, you know all about the domicile/residence situation and supposedly accept it, so it couldn't be considered fraud by misrepresentation.

In my question, though, I was asking specifically about third cities. My domicile and my residence are close enough that I would have fewer problems getting from one to the other, even in lockdown. But what if there's an unexpected lockdown in my residence city and not my domicile city when I am on my way to a third city? My question asked for a clarification of obligations specifically for this example, as I have been unable to find any documents or advice. If it is no different from what I would be expected to do in a less convoluted situation, that's good information. If it is different, then I would like to know.

Thanks!

(01 Apr '16, 06:14) JuliaP

do you think that we then shouldn't have professional addresses that are different from our physical addresses at all?

It's entirely your call. If you do, you should be aware that there are consequences for some private law contracts that you enter into when you accept work on the private market. Be aware that to a recruiter, this is just another additional hassle to deal with, and this is not how you'll get more work

But what if there's an unexpected lockdown in my residence city and not my domicile city when I am on my way to a third city?

This is not supposed to happen without the knowledge of the recruiter who offered you a job in that third city. The whole point of having a professional address is to provide certainty about travel costs and times.

Even if you were, as you must, to shoulder all extra costs associated with your residing outside of your professional address, not knowing where you will depart from may cause problems.

Consider this: the meeting may start early (and I'm hiring you by the day) and you may not get that morning train from your city of residence, or the client may wish to organise flights for all interpreters on the team (assuming they will all leave from the same professional address), etc.

(01 Apr '16, 08:22) Vincent Buck

Thanks for your clarification. All those things have happened to me already, and I have dealt with them without a problem, by using common sense and putting myself in the recruiter's shoes. No questions there. I always arrive the day before, I am there for the full day, and when a group was sent from my professional address, I traveled there to take the plane. I am a professional and do act as such.

However, in our oh so mobile profession, what with unexpected lockdowns in various cities, volcano eruptions every so often, and - more mundanely - professionals agreeing to work in their home base the day after they worked elsewhere, I thought I would ask what other experienced interpreters understood as our legal obligations.

(01 Apr '16, 09:30) JuliaP

Your professional address is, with your language combination and your overall qualifications, why get recruited or not. (Vincent)

Peut-être dans l'esprit d'un interprète-conseil, mais je peine à retrouver une telle idée dans nos textes.

Si je ne m'abuse, à l'époque du tarif AIIC, le domicile professionnel était tant utilisé par les organisations internationales signataires d'une convention AIIC que par l'AIIC elle-même pour déterminer la méthode de calcul de frais de voyage dûs à l'interprète par tout client.

Depuis qu'il n'y a plus de tarif AIIC, pour le marché non-conventionné, le concept de domicile a disparu. De jure, je suis désormais libre de ne pas facturer mes frais de voyage et de renoncer à l'hôtel payé par le client, quand bien même je vis à X-ville et que je dois travailler à Y-ville. Le successeur du domicile, l'adresse professionnelle (AP) quant à elle n'a, pour l'association du moins, plus qu'un seul objectif défini :

Professional Standards Version adopted in 2012 entering into force as amended at the 2015 Assembly. Article 1

Professional Address

Members of the Association shall declare a single professional address. It shall be published in the Association's list of members and shall be used, inter alia, as a basis for setting up regions.

Members in the permanent employment of an organisation's language department must declare in the list of members that they are employed by that organisation. Their professional address shall be at the place of their registered employment.

Article 1

Adresse Professionnelle

Les membres de l'Association déclarent un lieu où se trouve leur adresse professionnelle. Il figure sur la liste des membres de l'Association et sert, entre autres, de base à la constitution des régions.

Les membres employés de façon permanente par les services linguistiques d'une organisation doivent faire figurer leur appartenance à cette organisation dans la liste des membres et leur adresse professionnelle ne peut être différente de leur lieu d'affectation.

Le "entre autres" est à mon sens trop vague pour pouvoir déduire une obligation contractuelle de résider dans la ville de son AP et le texte cité ne régit que les obligations entre les membres et l'association, sans qu'un tiers puisse s'en prévaloir (principe de l'effet relatif du contrat).

Le second paragraphe quant à lui, explicitant l'obligation faite au fonctonnaires de choisir comme AP leur lieu d'emploi, montre, en absence d'un texte semblable appliqué au lieu d'emploi principal et coutumier des inteprètes freelance, qu'il n'y a pas d'obligation de coïncidence, que ce soit entre AP et lieu de résidence, ou AP et lieu d'emploi principal et coutumier.

Dans le cas du secteur non-conventionné / marché privé, c'est le contrat qui prévaut. La simple mention du terme AP à lui seul, à côté de la combinaison linguistique ne sera pas créateur d'obligation entre les parties. Par ailleurs, j'ai des doutes sur la validité d'une clause qui s'immiscerait dans la vie privée d'un prestataire de services au point de lui imposer où il doit passer la nuit avant d'aller travailler.

Cela dit, Vincent, je comprends parfaitement ta volonté de savoir si la personne que tu recrutes sera capable de venir à vélo qu'il vente ou qu'il pleuve, ou si elle sera tributaire d'une ligne de train qui alterne grèves et pannes. Les conséquences du no show se limiteront à une absence de recrutements futurs, mais ne se traduiront que difficilement en dommages-intérêts. Cela étant dit, l'idée d'être blacklisté à jamais dans la ville où on espérait travailler le plus est probablement suffisant en termes d'effets dissuasifs pour que le scénario ne se produise pas très souvent. Mais le sens que tu donnes à l'AP n'a à mes yeux pas de force contractuelle ni d'effet juridique. C'est coutumier, éventuellement de l'entente tactite.

D'ailleurs, si on regarde les règles applicables aux DP pour le secteur conventionné, les règles sont floues et diffèrent d'un endroit à un autre :

ONU (point 3): The professional domicile does not have to correspond to the interpreter's place of residence or his/her mailing address; however, an interpreter cannot claim more than one professional domicile at the time. The professional domicile must be a locality, not a country or a region.

UE (article 13) : The professional domicile shall in principle be the point of departure and/or return of the ACI to and/or from the place of assignment.

Le texte UE a davantage trait au remboursement des frais de voyage. Il n'y a pas d'obligation expresse de résider dans la ville de son DP et l'application des règles par l'autre partie du contrat a toujours été telle que les "DP fictifs" étaient tolérés, pour ne pas dire encouragés. Or, en droit toujours, nul ne peut se prévaloir de sa propre turpitude.

Force est de constater aussi qu'il règne une certaine confusion entre AP et DP. L'AIIC France utilise les termes comme de parfaits synonymes, alors que les textes adoptés en AG ne semblent pas admettre un tel glissement :

AIIC France, code d'éthique:

Domicile professionnel

Les membres de l’AIIC doivent déclarer une adresse professionnelle. Cette règle favorise le recrutement « local » : les organisateurs emploient en premier lieu les interprètes de la région dans laquelle se déroule leur événement.

Professional domicile

AIIC members must declare a professional domicile. This means priority is given to ‘local’ interpreters whenever possible, if the language combination is available.

permanent link

answered 01 Apr '16, 07:18

Gaspar's gravatar image

Gaspar ♦♦
7.2k141829

edited 01 Apr '16, 07:39

  • Les textes de l'AIIC France sont évidemment caduques et doivent être corrigés sur ce point
  • Les textes de l'AIIC s'imposent évidemment aux recruteurs qui se prévalent de l'AIIC, et aux interprètes membres. Cela étant, rien n'empêche le recruteur dans ses contrats et/ou conditions d'engagement, de prévoir des clauses supplémentaires, que l'interprète est libre d'accepter ou non.
  • Fort heureusement, la plupart des interprètes pratiquant le marché privé et dotés d'une once de bon sens n'ont pas besoin de se faire expliquer ces règles absolument élémentaires pour la fourniture d'un service de qualité, dans l'intérêt même du client, du recruteur et des interprètes recrutés.
(01 Apr '16, 08:42) Vincent Buck

Les textes de l'AIIC s'imposent évidemment aux recruteurs qui se prévalent de l'AIIC, et aux interprètes membres.

Si tu m'engages mais que le contrat qui nous lie ne dit rien sur les effets de l'AP, ça s'arrête là.

Je respecte mes obligations vis-à-vis de l'association en ayant un seul AP déclaré, que je ne change que tous les six mois tout au plus. Si je violais la règle relatives à l'AP (et je ne sais pas comment, puisque ça passe par le secrétariat de Genève), tout ce que je risque, c'est des sanctions au sein de l'AIIC.

L'AP dans un contrat n'est pas plus indicatif de mon adresse véritable que l'est mon domicile fiscal ou mon adresse de correspondance. On ne peut pas décider qu'on va retenir l'une de ces trois créations qui ont chacune un but limité et lui attribuer une nouvelle signification, sans accord des deux parties.

Fort heureusement, la plupart des interprètes pratiquant le marché privé et dotés d'une once de bon sens n'ont pas besoin de se faire expliquer ces règles absolument élémentaire.

Vincent, deux approximations qui doivent être corrigées selon moi, par souci de rigueur dans nos réflexions :

  • Le bon sens et le droit sont deux choses différentes, parfois diamétralement opposées. La preuve en est, nos règles élémentaires ne nous imposent rien, alors que le bon sens oui. Julia ne fera pas de no show par négligence. Elle s'interroge simplement sur ce que dit le droit, par extension les contrats type.

  • Dans aucune de nos réponses, toi et moi, n'avons répondu à la question de Julia sur les obligations légales ou contractuelles pesant sur un interprète qui est affecté par un cas de force majeure, qui touche sa ville de départ par opposition à sa ville d'AP. Les réponses peuvent être multiples, en fonction des dispositions du contrat. La réponse selon laquelle l'AP fait foi et que tout autre configuration ouvre la voie à des poursuites civiles reste à démontrer : nos textes ne donnent à l'AP une seule fonction, interne à l'AIIC (i.e. régions).

(01 Apr '16, 09:07) Gaspar ♦♦

@gaspar

... dans ce long pensum qui me cite abondamment tu as omis de reprendre l'élément le plus important :

Cela étant, rien n'empêche le recruteur dans ses contrats et/ou conditions d'engagement, de prévoir des clauses supplémentaires, que l'interprète est libre d'accepter ou non.

Tout le reste n'est que oiseuses conjectures, et ni le renvoi à la définition aiicienne de l'adresse professionnelle (qui ne sert plus qu'à constituer des régions, depuis que la FTC est passée par là en 1994) ou encore la référence à l'interprétation du domicile professionnel selon les accords n'aideront Julia à comprendre ce qui est, pour tout interprète qui pratique le marché privé, une évidence, à savoir que le fait de devoir systématiquement voyager pour un recrutement 'local' constitue un aléa que, toutes choses égales par ailleurs, le recruteur, agissant pour le compte de son client ou compte propre, préféreront ne pas assumer et, à tout le moins, voudront avoir être informés préalablement.

Pour le surplus, et pour la gouverne de ceux de nos lecteurs qui auront eu le courage de nous suivre si loin below the fold, je me permets de te corriger sur autre un point essentiel:

Si je violais la règle relatives à l'AP (et je ne sais pas comment, puisque ça passe par le secrétariat de Genève),

Il y a violation de la règle dans la mesure où tu déclarerais un adresse professionnelle différente à plusieurs recruteurs, du marché conventionné ou privé AIIC. C'est malheureusement plus fréquent qu'on ne peut le penser.

Pour résumer, l'adresse professionnelle est :

  • une et une seule ville
  • déclarée telle quelle à TOUS les recruteurs de l'interprète sans exception et
  • notifiée à l'AIIC avec un préavis minimal de 30 jours,
  • valable pendant au moins 6 mois,
  • qui sert à des fins administratives au sein de l'AIIC et
  • généralement à la détermination des frais de voyage, per diems, approches, etc, en cas de recrutement en dehors de cette adresse professionnelle dans les relations de travail entre interprètes et recruteurs.
  • Hors convention de travail AIIC, les dispositions de droit privé régissant l'engagement d'interprètes priment.
  • Cette ville peut ne pas coïncider avec l'adresse de résidence, ou l'adresse fiscale de l'interprète. Cela dit, en ce qui concerne le marché privé, tant l'adresse de résidence que l'adresse fiscale (entraînant obligations de TVA, etc) sont des éléments factuels influant sur le choix de recruter tel ou tel interprète.
(01 Apr '16, 09:52) Vincent Buck

le fait de devoir systématiquement voyager pour un recrutement 'local' constitue un aléa

Certes, mais ce n'est pas sur ce scénario que porte la question initiale. Que je vive à Londres avec AP Paris, engagé à Prague, ou que je vive à Paris avec AP Paris, toujours engagé à Prague, je ne suis local dans aucune des deux hypothèses.

(01 Apr '16, 09:58) Gaspar ♦♦

Pour répondre à la question posée :

To give a concrete example, let's say the interpreter were living in London but professionally based as a local in Paris. The interpreter has a contract in Prague, and is flying from London. In normal circumstances, this goes smoothly, and is sometimes cheaper than flying from Paris, so organizers are happy to save the money.

In unusual circumstances, something happens on the travel day, and all flights are cancelled out of London, but not out of Paris. Trains and buses may work, but be overcrowded as flights are cancelled. What are the interpreter's obligations in this case?

Le droit civil étant différent d'un pays à l'autre, il n'y a pas de réponse clé en main puisque l'interprétation des concepts comme la force majeure ne sera pas nécessairement la même. Aussi, se pose la question du contenu précis du contrat liant l'interprète à son recruteur.

  • Termes du contrat

Comme évoqué précédemment, l'AP a une fonction interne à l'AIIC, à savoir déterminer l'appartenance des membres à une région.

Dans le cas d'une recruteur lié à une convention AIIC, les règles spéciales du DP (≠ AP) s'appliquent.

Si la ville de départ n'est pas contractuellement déterminée, l'interprète a pour seule obligation d'être en cabine à l'heure et la date convenues. Une clause qui se contente d'établir que le prix du billet d'avion de classe Y entre la ville A et la ville B servira comme forfait de remboursement pour le voyage ne constitue, a priori, pas d'obligation de partir de cette même ville A.

  • Responsabilité civile et force majeure

Sauf clauses plus poussées (cf. les remarques de Vincent), l'interprète doit être à l'endroit où on l'a commandé à l'heure à laquelle on l'a commandé, conformément aux termes du contrat. Pour être exonéré de ces obligations, on peut invoquer la force majeure. On parle en droit français d'un fait imprévisible (inévitable), irrésistible et extérieur. L'examen se fait au cas par cas.

Une grève générale, une éruption volcanique ou une fermeture des frontières constituent des éléments inévitables lorsqu'ils surviennent, à défaut d'être imprévisibles. Suivant les moyens à mettre en oeuvre pour surmonter ces évènements, ils peuvent aussi s'avérer irrésistibles.

Une grève générale peut cependant être à la fois prévisible et évitable, si par exemple on quitte Londres pour Paris (ou Prague) un jour plus tôt ou qu'on fait un détour par Paris où les transports fonctionnent correctement.

Alors, la question sera davantage de savoir qui paye la note et la réponse se trouvera (dans le meilleur des mondes) dans les clauses relatives au changement de circonstances. A défaut, il faudra interpréter l'intention des parties. Est-ce que le client a voulu s'engager à payer les frais réels du voyage, faisant peser le risque sur ses propres épaules ? Est-ce que l'interprète s'est engagé à voyager en échange du paiement d'un forfait, à ses risques et périls ?

Mais comme l'illustrent les propos de Vincent, la clareté et la transparence sont toujours bénéfiques aux parties. S'il est évident que le client avait toutes les informations à disposition (ce qui semble être le cas, "flying from London (...) is sometimes cheaper than flying from Paris, so organizers are happy to save the money"), il pourra difficilement en faire le reproche à l'interprète si celui-ci rencontre, dans notre scénario fictif, un cas de force majeure à Londres qui n'affecte pas Paris.

permanent link

answered 01 Apr '16, 10:18

Gaspar's gravatar image

Gaspar ♦♦
7.2k141829

edited 01 Apr '16, 10:20

Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Question tags:

×9
×8

question asked: 29 Mar '16, 13:18

question was seen: 3,738 times

last updated: 04 Apr '16, 08:29

interpreting.info is a community-driven website open to anyone with questions and/or answers about interpreting, i.e. spoken language translation

about | faq | terms of use | privacy policy | content policy | disclaimer | contact us

This collaborative website is sponsored and hosted by AIIC, the International Association of Conference Interpreters.