First-time posters: please review the site's moderation policy

Chers tous,

Pour pouvoir ajouter un B, que ce soit sur le marché privé ou dans les organismes internationaux, faut-il fournir des preuves attestant un séjour de plusieurs mois voir d'une année dans un pays anglophone? Autre question, quand vous partez vous immerger dans un pays étranger afin de parfaire vos langues, à quelles activités vous livrez-vous? Je compte partir dans un pays anglophone pendant 3 mois cet été et j'aimerais rentabiliser mon temps le mieux possible. Je m'inscris dans un "summer program"? Je prends des cours particuliers?

Merci,

Bonne journée et bonne année!!

asked 02 Jan '16, 09:29

Jonathan1948's gravatar image

Jonathan1948
11337

edited 02 Jan '16, 13:46

G%C3%A1sp%C3%A1r's gravatar image

Gáspár ♦
6.5k141829


Pour pouvoir ajouter un B, que ce soit sur le marché privé ou dans les organismes internationaux, faut-il fournir des preuves attestant un séjour de plusieurs mois voir d'une année dans un pays anglophone?

Pas directement, mais...

1) Pour bien s'insérer sur le marché privé, il est préférable de sortir d'une école dont la réputation n'est plus à faire pour l'enseignement d'un B. Et celles-ci vont te demander d'avoir séjourné dans le pays de la langue B durant une période minimale de 12 mois continus. Si ces écoles sont situées là où le retour anglais est le plus demandé (à Paris, donc), l'insertion professionnelle sera facilitée, surtout si elle est soutenue par les enseignants.

Voir aussi : http://interpreting.info/questions/6250/isit-paris-entry-requirements

2) Pour les organisations internationales, là aussi la réputation de l'établissement va compter, car les tests sont coûteux et gourmands en temps. On testera alors en priorité les gens sortis d'une école réputée pour la qualité de ses diplômés.

Autre question, quand vous partez vous immerger dans un pays étranger afin de parfaire vos langues, à quelles activités vous livrez-vous? Je compte partir dans un pays anglophone pendant 3 mois cet été et j'aimerais rentabiliser mon temps le mieux possible. Je m'inscris dans un "summer program"? Je prends des cours particuliers?

Fais ce que tu ne pourrais pas faire sans être dans le pays. Travaille activement la langue et profite d'être en contact direct avec des locuteurs natifs. Explore les particularités culturelles, administratives, politiques,... pour mieux saisir le pays.

A lire également : http://www.cciconline.net/documents/texts/(FR)%20Les%20langues%20B.pdf

permanent link

answered 02 Jan '16, 13:19

G%C3%A1sp%C3%A1r's gravatar image

Gáspár ♦
6.5k141829

Hello Jonathan,

Having made a B from scratch, and having had both sorts of stays in the country of my B language (Russia), I can recommend both taking classes or simply living as a "native."

In the first instance, you are forced to speak with people about topics you wouldn't necessarily discuss with your average person on the street, or at the same high level, such as art history, the history of WW II, literature, linguistics, geopolitics, etc. You will be forced to show you not only understand the topic, but can express yourself on complex topics with precision and using sophisticated vocabulary. Personally, I would take classes in whatever either interests you hugely, or on topics where you have gaps in your knowledge. Also, if the country of your B language has a radically different view of the world than the country of your A, then any history, geopolitics or political science class will be great. This stay gave me a great base for building a good B, and as I made friends with other students who didn't speak English, it was invaluable training for understanding Russian with accents, which has stood me in good stead since!

Living as a "native," either staying with a family or else getting a job and staying on your own, is also valuable. You watch the same TV programs, listen to the same radio programs, talk to fellow workers or the families about what things mean, see (and read) the best-sellers, go to/follow sporting events, and see how the country actually functions - how one goes to the doctor, what greetings are typical at the beginning of the work day, what things come up repeatedly during the day, what signs people see... All this will also stand you in good stead when you have to formulate sentences in the booth. And just wandering around looking and listening to people will help enormously.

As Gaspar says, I have only ever had to show proof of my stay when I went to interpreting school. However, it raised my credibility enormously on the job to be able to speak to my clients about the recent New Year special on TV this year, or use catch phrases from books or movies that they had seen.

permanent link

answered 07 Jan '16, 09:04

JuliaP's gravatar image

JuliaP
2.9k249

edited 10 Jan '16, 09:54

Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Question tags:

×71
×68
×66
×30
×11

question asked: 02 Jan '16, 09:29

question was seen: 1,175 times

last updated: 10 Jan '16, 09:54

interpreting.info is a community-driven website open to anyone with questions and/or answers about interpreting, i.e. spoken language translation

about | faq | terms of use | privacy policy | content policy | disclaimer | contact us

This collaborative website is sponsored and hosted by AIIC, the International Association of Conference Interpreters.