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Romanian is my mother tongue. En-Ro both at A, Fr at B, Ru and Pl at C-level.

Are there any figures in recent EU reports that would substantiate a need for an En-Ro retour with Fr-RU-Pl as C-languages in 2-3 years from now? I am very worried that there is no work at the EU, or elsewhere at institutions throughout the EU for this language combination, or that demand will dry up by the time I get accredited. Would I be better off on the U.S.A. or Canadian market?

Having a B language seems a bit awkward - some sort of neither here nor there, and I am not sure if I should bother declaring French as a B, even if that is the level at which my French is at?

I am really worried about not being able to earn a living from interpreting once I complete my education even if I move to a city like Brussels or Geneva and even if I factor in the what seem to be taken for granted 1 to 2 years as a newbie. Would having two undergraduate degrees, one in chemistry and another one in translation En-Fr increase my chances of being hired?

If I can do the job on par with MCI graduates, do I stand a chance at being hired with no MCI?

Thank you all for invaluable mentoring and advice.

asked 31 Jan '15, 19:56

mbg's gravatar image

mbg
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edited 04 Feb '15, 03:42

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It seems like taking a stab at the job without the MCI is not wise at all. My plan is to pursue a Master's degree at Glendon, in Toronto, or at either one of the two MCI programs in Paris. Any thoughts on choosing well between the two locations are very welcome. Once I am done, assuming I can graduate from the MCI with Ro-En as A-languages & Ru,Pl and Fr as C-languages, if I play bold and decide to start working from Montpellier...would there be enough work for me in Nice, Marseille, Montpellier? Can you think of any EU institutions in these cities or other organizations spread across the French Riviera which would be interested in my language combination?

(01 Feb '15, 16:20) mbg
3

Glendon has been around only for a couple of years. It is thus less renowned than Paris. Some people also might have doubts about their one year long remote-teaching approach. Plus, it's far from Europe. If you want to work on the European market, it's better to have studied in Paris when it comes to contacts and reputation.

French Riviera: As a beginner, RO + C languages will give you work in Brussels, provided you are based in Brussels. EN + RU C & FR C will give you work in Geneva, provided you are based in Geneva. It's unlikely that there will be enough gigs with EN<>RO to pay your bills in the south of France.

(01 Feb '15, 16:32) Gaspar ♦♦
1

Thank you all for answering as soon as I posted, it makes all the difference and is greatly appreciated.

Please close the thread.

(01 Feb '15, 18:49) mbg

Are there any figures in recent EU reports that would substantiate a need for an En-Ro retour with Fr-RU-Pl as C-languages in 2-3 years from now? I am very worried that there is no work at the EU, or elsewhere at institutions throughout the EU for this language combination, or that demand will dry up by the time I get accredited. Would I be better off on the U.S.A. or Canadian market?

Here are the possible markets for you, provided your language combination is accurate. Only the EU and UN would use your C languages. For other employers and parts of the world, mostly only your active languages would be useful.

There are no public reports or need assessments for the upcoming years. The only document published is the language profiles in demand for the ongoing year.

But if you're really double A plus have a retour into French plus have a Polish C, your profile is interesting both for the EN and the RO booth and still will be in three years, since you'd start your career with more languages than many senior interpreters.

Would having two undergraduate degrees, one in chemistry and another one in translation En-Fr increase my chances of being hired?

No. At least not directly. Any additional knowledge can turn out to be useful to you, make your assignment easier, allow you to perform better than if you hadn't had that one class about polymers. Plus, some see it as an advantage if you don't start your MCI before you turn about 24-25. You'll be more self-confident, more mature and will have more general knowledge.

If I can do the job on par with MCI graduates, do I stand a chance at being hired with no MCI?

That's a very big if. Can you dance as well as a professional tango dancer without ever having taken classes? If yes, you stand a chance, provided your employer doesn't require you to have a paper saying that you can dance. The EU for instance would only test people who have a degree in conference interpreting, because chances are low that a natural born talent will be on par from day one with a graduate. A propos: Are there conference interpreters on the market with no training?

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answered 01 Feb '15, 05:48

Gaspar's gravatar image

Gaspar ♦♦
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edited 01 Feb '15, 09:03

Gaspar is spot on with his answers. I would just add...

  • Don't forget the non-EU markets - you don't only have to work in the EU (as I mentioned here)

  • There's not really much point in having an FR B in the EU if you already have EN & RO As.

  • I very much doubt that there's any work with RO on the US and Canadian markets. If you have a FR B then maybe, but if the rest of your language combination holds up, then you'd be ignoring all the more obvious and lucrative markets to go there. (Of course if you really want to be in N.America then that's a different matter.)

  • the prospects for the EN booth in the EU (but also elsewhere) are probably better than other booths (FR, ES, IT) because there are fewer people coming thru (English speaking countries don't have a great record in producing big numbers of linguists)

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answered 01 Feb '15, 09:38

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Andy
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I would just add that based on what you've written, I'm not sure that English is an A language for you - it seems more like a strong B? (If you haven't read it before, here's a useful post explaining exactly what A, B, and C languages are.)

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answered 01 Feb '15, 10:34

permfmt's gravatar image

permfmt
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1

One should indeed bear in mind that many students don't make it through the entrance exam because their (one and only) A language (of the country in which they usually spent their whole life) isn't good enough to meet the standard for conference interpreting. There are very, very few colleagues who have two As.

One might be what we'd commonly call bilingual, but not biactive at conference interpreting level.

Also worth reading:

I may have no A language

University refusing to accept EN as my A

(01 Feb '15, 12:55) Gaspar ♦♦

Being an English A gives you a lot of leeway in terms of job opportunities. You will probably have to be based in one of the big hubs (BXL, GVA, PAR, NYC, DC) in order to try and make a good living out of it. 2-3 years is about the time it takes for most novice interpreters to become financially stable. Nowadays, it is near impossible to get an accreditation test at any institutional employer as a novice interpreter if you don't have previous training (either a post-graduate program or an MA). Working in the Romanian booth will mean the bulk of your work will be at the EU or in the private market. If you ask me, that's a lot of professional, financial, and psychological eggs to put in one basket.

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answered 01 Feb '15, 15:17

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Anyuli Ináci...
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question asked: 31 Jan '15, 19:56

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