First-time posters: please review the site's moderation policy

Guten Abend,

ich bin 20 Jahre alt, US-amerikanischer Staatsbürger und studiere gerade im Bachelor Internationale Beziehungen und Französisch an einer öffentlichen Universität in den USA. Als Kind habe ich zwei Jahre lang in Deutschland gelebt und später war ich dann im Jugendaustausch noch elf Monate lang in der deutschsprachigen Schweiz. Ich spreche Englisch (Muttersprache), Deutsch/Schweizerdeutsch (C1-C2), Französisch (B1-B2), Russisch und Spanisch (A2-B1). Beruflich möchte ich sehr gerne in Zukunft als Konferenzdolmetscher arbeiten können und würde mich gerne deshalb darüber informieren, auf was für einen weiteren Bildungsweg ich mich einzustellen habe. Insbesondere gibt es ein paar Fragen, die mich in letzter Zeit beschäftigt haben:

  • Wie kann ich mich am besten auf eine Ausbildung zum Konferenzdolmetscher vorbereiten? Inwiefern kann ich jetzt meine Sprachkenntnisse am besten weiter ausbauen und vertiefen?
  • Welche Sprachkombination wäre mit den oben genannten Sprachen am konkurrenzfähigsten? Reicht es, wenn ich Deutsch als B-Sprache und Französisch als C-Sprache wähle, oder soll ich besser noch eine C-Sprache dazu nehmen?
  • Hätte ich als nicht-Europäer große Schwierigkeiten damit, an einen Studienplatz im Konferenzdolmetschen an einer europäischen Hochschule (vorzugsweise im deutschsprachigen Raum) zu kommen?

Ich bedanke mich im Voraus für irgendwelche Antworten und freue mich über jede Rückmeldung.

asked 05 Jan '15, 18:03

Michael20's gravatar image

Michael20
31113

edited 06 Jan '15, 14:34

Nacho's gravatar image

Nacho ♦
73381532


Hallo Michael,

Wie kann ich mich am besten auf eine Ausbildung zum Konferenzdolmetscher vorbereiten? Inwiefern kann ich jetzt meine Sprachkenntnisse am besten weiter ausbauen und vertiefen?

Die Frage wurde sicherlich am häufigsten hier aber auch auf Blogs und sonstigen Webseiten beantwortet. Am besten googlen. Knapp: Lesen, hören, reisen. ;-)

Welche Sprachkombination wäre mit den oben genannten Sprachen am konkurrenzfähigsten? Reicht es, wenn ich Deutsch als B-Sprache und Französisch als C-Sprache wähle, oder soll ich besser noch eine C-Sprache dazu nehmen?

Die Kernfrage ist, wo du wohnen bzw. arbeiten willst.

  • EN A <> DE B, plus die eine oder andere C-Srache wäre etwas für dein Heimatland oder für eine Karriere in Deutschland. Dabei musst Du beachten, dass der Markt in den Staaten heterogener ist, als in Europa: Other markets than conference interpreting?

  • EN A, DE B (oder DE C), FR C, ES C: Traumkombination für die Institutionen der Europäischen Union (Brüssel bzw. Strassburg).

  • EN A, FR C, ES C, RU C: Traumkombination für die Vereinte Nationen (sei es New-York, Genf, Wien oder Nairobi).

3 C-Sprachen vor Studiumbeginn wären vorteilhaft. Früher oder später musst du eh eine dritte C-Sprache lernen.

Hätte ich als nicht-Europäer große Schwierigkeiten damit, an einen Studienplatz im Konferenzdolmetschen an einer europäischen Hochschule (vorzugsweise im deutschsprachigen Raum) zu kommen?

Kann ich leider nicht beantworten. In deinem Fall würde es vielleicht Sinn machen in Genf zu studieren. Die Stadt ist zwar nicht deutschsprachig, die Schule bietet aber auch ES>EN an, im Gegensatz zu Germersheim wo du "nur" FR>EN und DE<>EN studieren könntest.

permanent link

answered 06 Jan '15, 06:24

G%C3%A1sp%C3%A1r's gravatar image

Gáspár ♦
6.5k141829

edited 06 Jan '15, 06:25

Hallo Gaspar,

vielen Dank für deine Antwort. Es ist schon ein großer Wunsch von mir, eines Tages mal wieder in Deutschland leben und arbeiten zu können. Weißt du, ob ich mich dort auch als Konferenzdolmetscher selbständig machen könnte, auch wenn ich noch kein EU-Bürger bin?

Wenn es um die Studienangebote an Hochschulen geht, bekomme ich oftmals den Eindruck, dass es im Grunde zwei Optionen gibt, die traditionellerweise zum Abschluss führen: d.h. man richtet die eigene Sprachkombination entweder nach dem Muster ABC oder nach dem Muster ACC(C) aus. Kommt es jedoch auch vor, dass man sich im Studium eine B-Sprache und zwei C-Sprachen aussucht? Oder ist es tatsächlich so der Fall, dass man sich für die eine oder andere Variante entscheiden muss?

(06 Jan '15, 23:18) Michael20

To answer your question about being non-EU in an EU world:

The tricky bit is that it depends entirely on the member state, since immigration is a national question. In France, for instance, in order to practice anything freelance, the tax filing system requires a special tax status that is only available for foreigners with a work visa AND full employment or to permanent residents. That means that you need to be hired somewhere that pays 1,5x minimum wage in a contract and on the side you are allowed to work freelance. OR you gain permanent residency either through marriage or completing option A successfully for a couple years.

I know in Germany, gaining permanent residency (or "long-term", so they call it, though it's infinitely renewable) is generally easier than in France. If you're educated and a part of the professional class, it's quite easy. So, if Germany is where you long to be, consider doing some other degree in Germany on a student visa, which you can then turn into a work visa after graduation once you get a job. This will be good for your German, your general knowledge and expand your horizons, in addition to making your eventual permanent residency application that much more attractive.

Your final option, if all else fails, is to meet a nice European citizen from a country that grants residency through civil partnerships (Sweden for instance grants residency if you can somehow document that you've been 'dating' for at least a year, plus Sweden is really lovely in the summer). This is technically fraud, so I encourage you to also sincerely fall in love with them.

Long story short, no. Being non-EU does not keep you out of the EU markets, but you do face extra challenges in terms of paperwork and administration. Your classmates will say they sympathise, but they don't really :) It is the same paperwork and administration, though, you'd have to endure to do anything in Europe as a non-EU national.

Across the board, EU member state residency systems function around your perceived integration, usefulness, and financial/social risk. The language industry is a good place to be in for this reason. High fluency in German - good. Interpreting into English means you're not taking any Germans' jobs - also good. Lots of education involved - good. High skill, professional degree that leads to a relatively high-paying job means low-risk of becoming a burden to the welfare system - good. Being from a first world, politically stable country makes them perceive you as a low crime risk - good for you, but bad for social equality. It's utilitarian, but the German system is by far one of the less opaque ones to navigate. Be glad you're not attempting Denmark or the UK.

If you run into trouble, there are lots of immigration consultancy firms throughout Europe that can help you do your paperwork when you're starting out, help you apply for residency, or navigate the US tax code for Americans abroad, which is a nightmare that you are subscribed to for as long as you retain your nationality. Prices vary, but the one I used in France was well worth it when I hit some unanticipated problems with my status and they gave me great advice about how to be strategic with my status renewals and visa class changes. From what I saw in Berlin, reputable ones will do a consultation for about 40 euros, where they just tell you your options, and then for about 200 euros you can have everything done - paperwork filed, someone will go with you to the integration meeting, they'll translate your birth certificate with official stamps - the whole shebang.

All of that is in regards to working freelance. I'm not sure of the policies of the EU institutions themselves, but I believe they do hire freelancers as long as they have the right to exercise a freelance job within the country in question, regardless of nationality. As for staffers, I can't answer that.

There's also the Blue Card, which I know very little about. It is for highly skilled migrants to the EU and is an EU-level residency permit (minus UK, Denmark and Ireland) of some kind that lasts three years. Here is a link: http://www.apply.eu/BlueCard/ I remember looking into it and not exactly getting it and moving on.

permanent link

answered 13 Jan '15, 01:30

charlielee's gravatar image

charlielee
564191928

Your answer
toggle preview

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Markdown Basics

  • *italic* or _italic_
  • **bold** or __bold__
  • link:[text](http://url.com/ "title")
  • image?![alt text](/path/img.jpg "title")
  • numbered list: 1. Foo 2. Bar
  • to add a line break simply add two spaces to where you would like the new line to be.
  • basic HTML tags are also supported

Question tags:

×479
×141
×85
×50
×26
×24

question asked: 05 Jan '15, 18:03

question was seen: 3,922 times

last updated: 13 Jan '15, 01:30

interpreting.info is a community-driven website open to anyone with questions and/or answers about interpreting, i.e. spoken language translation

about | faq | terms of use | privacy policy | content policy | disclaimer | contact us

This collaborative website is sponsored and hosted by AIIC, the International Association of Conference Interpreters.