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As, what I imagine, the longest user on this site to maintain my 'aspiring' status, I think I'm going to apply to ESIT next year with A - EN, C-FR, DE, DK. ACCC and ABC are both combinations that they accept, but I'm nervous about my Danish. I won't have the time or the means to go back to Denmark for the kind of length of time I'd like and I have this feeling my Danish is not yet a C. I'm doing a Masters now in German/Scandinavian studies with translation here in Paris. So, with another year and a half of living, studying, working and surviving my mémoire in French, I might be able to push my French to a B if I work super hard. This was a really long way of getting to my question: if you apply to a school with a proposed ACCC and they say that your A, C1, and C2 are passable but C3 is a mess, is that a rejection? Is it school-specific? If you apply for an ABC with a weak B that could work as a C, do they just show you the door for overestimating yourself or politely downgrade you? I'm just not clear on how all-or-nothing a language combination proposal is, yet it seems somehow very strategic.

The Parisian private market makes me think that a strong ABC EN/FR/DE is the best route, but an ACCC with Danish would be better for EU institutional stuff. As a non-EU citizen, though, I should maybe bank on the private market combination.

asked 13 Oct '14, 18:49

charlielee's gravatar image

charlielee
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Apologies if this is a reformulation of a question asked a million times already. The focus, though, is on the possibility of changing a combination after the entrance exams and whatnot. I can't find concrete info on any websites about examiners allowing you to move the pieces around.

(13 Oct '14, 18:54) charlielee

if you apply to a school with a proposed ACCC and they say that your A, C1, and C2 are passable but C3 is a mess, is that a rejection?

As far as I know, if your C3 is not really a C, then yes, that would be a rejection at ESIT. (I got this information based on years of browsing interpreters.freeforums.org and reading about the experiences of ESIT candidates -- you're not alone in the "forever aspiring" boat! :P) It's worth noting, though, that the metric they use at the exam might be a bit subjective; I passed the ISIT exam (which is supposed to be very similar to ESIT's) in September with what I felt was a very weak FR C, but they ended up admitting me with the note that my French was "à affiner".

do they just show you the door for overestimating yourself or politely downgrade you?

If you apply with an ABCC and they decide your B is really only a C, then they can still admit you with an ACCC combo -- in other words, they won't hold it against you that you overestimated your B. If you look at the list of admitted students for 2014, you can see that many of them have a note next to their language combination: "admis avec allemand C", "admis sans arabe", etc., which presumably shows that they were admitted despite having one of their languages downgraded. However, if you apply with an ABC and your B ends up being downgraded, you won't be admitted with an ACC combination.

I hope that helped! I'm far from an expert, though, so I hope more qualified people can weigh in on this.

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answered 15 Oct '14, 02:44

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permfmt
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question asked: 13 Oct '14, 18:49

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last updated: 15 Oct '14, 02:44

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