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Hello!

I contacted some interpreters in Brazil but so far I haven't gotten very far so I'm wondering if anyone happens to have anything to contribute. I'm a CI student in Europe with EN-PT-FR-ES (A-C-C-C) and I'd like to work in Brazil as a freelancer (assuming I pass course).

What I have so far: a Brazilian instructor told me the only way to start is as a volunteer in Rio. The BR dept. of state gave the number to an agency I can't seem to reach. I heard that for the Wold Cup and Olympics they're only taking volunteer interpreters. So I'm hoping there's some more information somewhere, as expats I've spoken with in Brazil lament the lack of Brazilians who can actually speak real English.

Btw, here's my case, which is rather uncommon apparently: Brazilian Portuguese is my mother tongue BUT it's one of my C languages because I've been away from Brazil for a long time - English is my A language. I can communicate in everyday Portuguese but I'm working on bringing the language up to a B.

Thanks!

asked 12 Mar '13, 14:40

TheInterpretator's gravatar image

TheInterpret...
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edited 12 Mar '13, 15:02

Nacho's gravatar image

Nacho ♦
73381532


Hello!

Brazil is a market that is slightly different to the market in Europe. The main reason it is different is because it is a market where interpreters need to be bilingual as 99% of the events are En- Pt. And it is important to mention that is has to be Brazilian Portuguese and not from Portugal. Therefore, we do not have events where an interpreter will work into English from many different languages. This is why the Brazilian instructor you mention told you that you would need to start as a volunteer because only NGOs would accept an interpreter without an A (or at least a very strong B) in Portuguese.

In order to be able to find some work in Brazil you would have to polish up your Portuguese to make it a very strong B as less than that would not be accepted in Brazil.

Appart from that, Brazil is a market that is 99.99% a freelance market, so you would not be able to "find" a job while in Europe and already move here with everything set. Unfortunately, you would need to pack your things and come down here and make yourself known amongst the consultant interpreters to get some work.

The big events as you mentioned will not ONLY be working with volunteers. But many of the more "simple" interpreting jobs shall be done by volunteers as is the case with all large sports events. But do note that all the big press conferences, congresses etc will hire professional interpreters as is the case since the bid to host both the Fifa World Cup and the Rio 2016 Games.

So to summarise my reply you do need to have a STRONG B in Portuguese to be able to work in Brazil and then you will need to approach it as the freelance market that it is. Have you looked at some of the tips on the AIIC Vega page? http://aiic.net/page/1803

Best of luck! (I hope you pass the course) :-)

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answered 13 Mar '13, 10:44

RLAVER's gravatar image

RLAVER
612

Thanks for your comment!

(14 Mar '13, 08:15) TheInterpret...

Hi there, I'll let Braz/silian colleagues field the substance of your query (if none replies here, I would suggest getting in touch with aiic's regional bureau for that country at brasil@aiic.net ) but let me correct two misconceptions: your mother tongue is of course what it is, not necessarily the one spoken in the country that isssued your passport nor where the place you spent your childhood in would indicate :-)... and one thing is volunteer interpreting for sundry language intermediation needs, another is professional conference interpreting which is not, repeat not, up to volunteers at either World Cup or Olympics. Boa sorte! :-)

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answered 12 Mar '13, 14:54

msr's gravatar image

msr
4.6k6923

Thanks! Re: Olympics/WC: that's exactly why I'm thinking there's gotta be more information out there. It just can't be like that :)

(12 Mar '13, 15:38) TheInterpret...

If you happen to be in Rio de janeiro on 18 March, and provided it's not already full, you can always attend the information session for beginners in Rio

If you can't, drop me an email with your details at m.piera-marin(at)aiic.net and I'll put you in touch with colleagues in Rio who will probably be able to advise you.

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answered 12 Mar '13, 15:16

Marta%20Piera%20Marin's gravatar image

Marta Piera ... ♦
2.7k182850

If you can get there, you might like to attend this event...

Information session for beginners in Rio on March 18, 2013

Junior interpreters and students are invited to a free information and discussion session with AIIC colleagues.

Want advice on those first crucial steps in the profession? Have questions about all things interpreting? The PUC-RIO Department of Letters Conference Interpretation course and the AIIC Vega network invite interpreters just starting out in the profession and students of interpretation to a Vega Event – the interpreter's world within your reach!

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answered 13 Mar '13, 07:12

Andy's gravatar image

Andy
6.8k212839

If you can get there, this might be a good way to find out about the market AND meet some of the interpreters working on it.

Information session for beginners in Rio on March 18, 2013

Want advice on those first crucial steps in the profession? Have questions about all things interpreting? The PUC-RIO Department of Letters Conference Interpretation course and the AIIC Vega network invite interpreters just starting out in the profession and students of interpretation to a Vega Event – the interpreter's world within your reach!

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answered 13 Mar '13, 11:55

Andy's gravatar image

Andy
6.8k212839

Thanks, Andy! I'm in Europe so not possible :) I was in touch with someone from PUC-Rio and they were the ones to tell me the only way to start is by volunteering.

(14 Mar '13, 07:42) TheInterpret...
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question asked: 12 Mar '13, 14:40

question was seen: 8,656 times

last updated: 14 Mar '13, 08:15

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