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Fast reading is effective in many aspects, esp. for information organization at last minute before a conference as mentioned by MSR here. Here I quoted: If texts show up in the booth at the very last minute, make sure you prepare the opening and closing paragraphs... and for the rest I strongly recommend learning speed-reading/visual scanning - which I was lucky enough to be able to do long ago.

But according to my understanding, this methods used to working with paper documents. I have some experience, like going through the table of contents, and with one hand holding the book spine, the other hand turning over pages quickly. I may get the gist out of books of my interest in a very short time. It works no difference with document of only one page, but with many pages and even a book, it is quite different.

Does fast reading also apply to electronic documents? E.g. the PDF/word from laptop, or e-book of intelligent mobile, or tablet. What is the mechanism here, since the pages cannot be turned over so quickly? When using computer, the mouse replaces hand in functioning, it cannot work that fast. And with the moible, the involvement of finger on the touch screen is more a distraction than help.

Thanks for your time and attention. :)

asked 12 Jan '13, 21:27

Paris%20Si%20de%20Chine's gravatar image

Paris Si de ...
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edited 14 Jan '13, 02:24

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...no idea, I'm sorry to say, I've never had occasion to try these techniques with new technologies :-(.

Perhaps because we no longer rely as heavily as we used to on masses of paper - and, in my case, I no longer work in an environment where great big piles, previously unavailable, would be sitting on the desk as I walked into the booth - after I left the institution where I had sat speed-reading classes and where I was a staff interpreter I used those skills only for speeches on paper and not reports or backgroung documents.

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answered 14 Jan '13, 16:58

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msr
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edited 14 Jan '13, 17:00

Hi, MSR: thanks for your strong support.With the informaiton provided by you, it seems like with the assistance of new technologies, such as internet, computer, intelligent mobile, we can touch as much material (related /similar to the content to be processed)as possible before hand. This is a big improvement for information availability, and for our job. The only thing is how much we can really absorb from the source into our brain. Thank you.

I have another thought, in case we can use these techniques even in this era, maybe we can improve our efficiency, too. For sure, within the limit of our endurance.:) Thanks.

(15 Jan '13, 02:16) Paris Si de ...
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question asked: 12 Jan '13, 21:27

question was seen: 1,832 times

last updated: 15 Jan '13, 02:16

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