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Si en un evento organizado por un intérprete que no está presente, un miembro de la audiencia nos pide nuestra tarjeta, ¿qué debemos hacer? Se me ocurren múltiples soluciones, pero ninguna es ideal: la mejor sería tener tarjetas del intérprete organizador y santo remedio. Pero, en caso de no contar con ellas... ¿cuál sería la mejor conducta? Una opción sería pedirle la tarjeta a la persona que nos solicitó la nuestra y decirle que se la haremos llegar al jefe de intérpretes... Otra sería tomar un pedazo de papel y escribirle los datos del jefe de intérpretes...

asked 11 Jun '12, 15:50

Vicky%20Massa's gravatar image

Vicky Massa
386238

edited 30 May '13, 07:14

Vincent%20Buck's gravatar image

Vincent Buck ♦♦
3.9k203350


I also think it is best to forward the person's card to the recruiting interpreter.

Some other situations come to mind e.g. where someone asks a group of interpreters for their business cards. If the recruiting interpreter is one of them, it is always helpful to let him/her go ahead and to claim to have forgotten to bring your own cards. Lengthy explanations why you don't want to give your own card might sound strange to the person who asked.

Any recruiting interpreter who was happy with the services rendered by his/her colleague(s) will remember who was on the team and recruit the same interpreters if possible or at least some of them in case he/she can accept the assignment himself/herself next time.

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answered 12 Jun '12, 07:45

AlmuteL's gravatar image

AlmuteL
3.8k101520

edited 31 Aug '12, 15:35

A menudo, la opción de tener una tarjeta del intérprete consultor para entregar puede complementarse con escribir nuestro nombre (sin más datos) de puño y letra sobre esa tarjeta. De ese modo, el interesado que quedó satisfecho con nuestro trabajo puede mencionar nuestro nombre al intérprete consultor. En general, los intérpretes consultores no tienen inconveniente con este proceder. Después de todo, al cliente seguramente le sucede como a nosotros cuando damos con un buen vendedor en una tienda, o una buena colorista en la peluquería - en nuestra siguiente visita querremos ser atendidos por la misma persona que se ganó nuestra confianza.

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answered 14 Jun '12, 21:26

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Laura
671459

Hello Vicky,

I am on and off ask for a business card when I am working in a team organized by another colleague. I always say that I have not any. If the consultant interpreter is at the venue, I put both prospective client and consultant interpreter in contact. If the recruiting interpreter isn't there, I often end up with the client's business card in may hand. Sometimes, I tell the prospective client to give me his/her busniess card and I tell the client that the recruiting interpreter will contact him/her. Afterwards, I get in contact with the organizing colleague and explained what happened and I send him/her the business card and details so s/he can take care of it. I feel that on an assignment I represent the organizing interpreter in every aspect and I must be loyal and fair to him/her. I expect the same the other way round. As Santiago puts it: the nice collateral is that this way you get brownie points with the recruiting colleague.

I don't go into explaining why I don't give the client my business card. Too much explanations and the client does not really understands, I fully agree with Almute

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answered 16 Jun '12, 11:10

Conrado's gravatar image

Conrado
1.1k1415

Estoy de acuerdo en NO entregar nuestra tarjeta personal en las situaciones en las que somos contratados por otro colega. Lo que justifica y explica este comportamiento es que debemos tener siempre presente que NUESTRO CLIENTE es el colega/intérprete consultor que nos contrató y a él/ella debemos lealtad.

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answered 20 Jun '12, 22:41

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Vero
8318819

...failing your 1st alternative, the third would also do at a pinch: my advice would be NEVER to give out your own card if you're not the recruiting interpreter.

These days, almost everybody has an Inet page, so giving out the recruiter's url could also be a way out, best if on something provided for the purpose, say a bookmark or some such... if you don't have any on you, perhaps someone else on the team does, you could promise to get back to the contact in question later during the conference.

Getting the third party's card and making sure the recruiter gets it will close the loop... AND get you brownie points with the recruiting colleague :-).

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answered 11 Jun '12, 16:53

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msr
4.6k6923

edited 12 Jun '12, 17:32

A menudo, la opción de tener una tarjeta del intérprete consultor para entregar puede complementarse con escribir nuestro nombre (sin más datos) de puño y letra sobre esa tarjeta. De ese modo, el interesado que quedó satisfecho con nuestro trabajo puede mencionar nuestro nombre al intérprete consultor. En general, los intérpretes consultores no tienen inconveniente con este proceder. Después de todo, al cliente seguramente le sucede como a nosotros cuando damos con un buen vendedor en una tienda, o una buena colorista en la peluquería - en nuestra siguiente visita querremos ser atendidos por la misma persona que se ganó nuestra confianza.

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answered 14 Jun '12, 21:32

Laura's gravatar image

Laura
671459

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question asked: 11 Jun '12, 15:50

question was seen: 4,086 times

last updated: 30 May '13, 04:52

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